RiboCeine - Glutathione production to the max

 

Glutathione (GSH) is produced by every cell in your body. It is the primary protector and detoxifier of the cell. For years, scientists and medical professionals have looked for ways to effectively raise glutathione levels. Because glutathione cannot be effectively absorbed through the intestinal tract, it must be supplemented via its essential building blocks, the amino acids cysteine, glycine, and glutamic acid. While glycine and glutamic acid are readily available through regular diet, it is much more difficult to absorb the required amounts of cysteine.

 

Until recently, N-acetyl Cysteine (NAC) was the most consistent means of enhancing the body's ability of maintaining optimal glutathione levels.

 

To be effective, NAC supplementation required large steady doses that could be inconvenient and overly expensive. Now, thanks to RiboCeine, the game has changed.

 

Optimal amounts of glutathione

 

RiboCeine has been shown to effectively deliver cysteine into the cell, enabling it to produce optimal amounts of glutathione. Unlike any other nutritional compound in the world, RiboCeine has been the subject of twenty published, peer-reviewed scientific studies that were funded by the National Institutes of Health and other scientific institutions. RiboCeine was developed after years of research by the renowned research scientist and medicinal chemist, Herbert T. Nagasawa, Ph.D.

 

Dr. Nagasawa was a Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and Toxicology at the University of Minnesota for forty years and at the same time he was named Senior Career Research Scientist for the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Minneapolis. For thirty-two of those years he was Senior Editor of the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. Dr. Nagasawa is driven to research ways to help humanity by improving health and wellness. A prolific researcher and author with 165 peer-reviewed and published clinical studies, Dr. Nagasawa has received millions of dollars in funding from some of the most respected health research institutions in America. The culmination of his personal drive and years of research and experience is RiboCeine.

 

RiboCeine outperforms others

 

RiboCeine combines Ribose and Cysteine, nutrients that are naturally occurring in humans, to more effectively deliver cysteine directly to your cells. This groundbreaking compound is a demand-release nutrient, activated by the body's cells. RiboCeine enters the bloodstream and is then used by the body to produce glutathione, the body's master antioxidant, and ATP, the cell's natural fuel and source of energy. Unsurpassed in effectiveness, RiboCeine has significantly outperformed all other means of glutathione enhancement against which it has been tested.

 











1. Jurkowska, H.; Uchacz, T.; Roberts, J.; Wrobel, M. Potential therapeutic advantage of ribose-cysteine in the inhibition of astrocytoma cell proliferation Amino Acids, 2 April 2010


2. Honzel, D.; Carter, S.G.; Redman, K.A.; Schauss, A.G.; Endres, J.R.; Jensen, G.S. Comparison of Chemical and Cell-Based Antioxidant Methods for Evaluation of Foods and Natural Products: Generating multifaceted Data by Parallel Testing Using Erythrocytes and Polymorphonuclear Cells. J. Agric, Food Chem 2008, 56, 831908325.


3. Heman-Ackah, S.E.; Juhn, S.K.; Huang, T.C.; Wiedmann, T.S. Potential therapeutic advantage of ribose-cysteine in the inhibition of astrocytoma cell proliferation. Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 2010, 143, 429-434.


4. Oz, H.S.; Chen, T.S.; Nagasawa, H., Comparative efficacies of 2 cysteine prodrugs and a glutathione delivery agent in a colitis model. Translational Research, 2007, 150(2), 122-129.


5. Lucas Slitt, A.M.; Dominick, P.K.; Roberts, J.C.; Cohen, S.D. Effect of Ribose Cysteine Pretreatment on Hepatic and Renal Acetaminophen Metabolite Formation and Glutathione Depletion. Basic Clin. Pharmacol. Toxicol., 2005, 96 (6), 487-94.


6. Lenarczyk, M.; Ueno, A.; Vannais, D.B.; Kraemer, S.; Kronenberg, A.; Roberts, J.C.; Tatsumi, K.; Hei, T.K.; Waldren, C.A. The "Pro-drug" RibCys Decreases the Mutagenicity of High-LET Radiation in Cultured Mammalian Cells. Radiation Research, 2003, 160, 579-583.


7. Wilmore, B.H.; Cassidy, P.B.; Warters, R.L.; Roberts, J.C. Thiazolidine Prodrugs as Protective Agents against y-Radiation-Induced Toxicity and Mutagenesis in V79 Cells. J. Med. Chem., 2001, 44(16), 2661-2666.



8. Lucus, A.M.; Henning G.; Dominick, P.K.; Whiteley, H.E.; Roberts, J.C.; Cohen, S.D. Ribose Cysteine Protects Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatic and Renal Toxicity. Toxicologic Pathology, 2000, 28(5), 697-704.


9.Roberts, J.C.; Phaneuf, H.L.; Dominick, P.K.; Wilmore, B.H.; Cassidy, P.B. Biodistribution of [35S] - Cysteine and Cysteine Prodrugs: Potential Impact on Chemoprotection Strategies. J. Labelled Cpd. Radiopharm., 1999, 42, 485-495.


10. Roberts, J.C.; Phaneuf, H.L.; Szakacs, J.G.; Zera, R.T.; Lamb, J.G.; Franklin, M.R. Differential Chemoprotection against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity by Latentiated L-Cysteines. Chem. Res. Toxicol., 1998, 11, 1274-1282.


11. Bantseev, V.; Bhardwaj, R.; Rathbun, W.; Nagasawa, H.T.; Trevithick, J.R. Antioxidants and Cataract: (Cataract Induction in Space Environment and Application to Terrestrial Aging Cataract). Biochem. Mol. Bio. Intl., 1997, 42, 1189-1197.


12. Roberts, J.C.; Koch, K.E.; Detrick, S.R.; Warters, R.L.; Lubec G. Thiazolidine Prodrugs of Cysteamine and Cysteine as Radioprotective Agents. Radiation Research, 1995, 143, 203-213.


13. Carroll, M.P.; Zera, R.T.; Roberts, J.C.; Schlafmann, S.E.; Feeny, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; West, M.A.; Bubrick, M.P. Efficacy of Radioprotective Agents in Preventing Small and Large Bowel Radiation Injury. Dis. Colon Rectum, 1995, 38(7), 716-722.


14. Roberts, J.C.;Francetic, D.J.; Zera, R.T. Chemoprotection against Cyclophosphamide-Induced Urotoxicity: Comparison of Nine Thiol Protective Agents. AntiCancer Research, 1994, 14, 389-396.


15. Rowe, J.K.; Zera, R.T.; Madoff, R.D.; Fink, A.S.; Roberts, J.C.; Johnston, G.R.; Freeney, D.A.;Young, H.L.; Bubrick, M.P. Protective Effect of RibCys Following High-Dose Irradiation of the Rectosigmoid. Dis. Colon Rectum, 1993, 36(7), 681-687.


16. Roberts, J.C.; Charyulu, R. L.; Zera, R.T.; Nagasawa, H.T. Protection Against Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Ribose-Cysteine (RibCys). Pharmacology & Toxicology, 1992, 70, 281-285.


17. Roberts, J.C.; Francetic, D.J. - Mechanisms of Chemoprotection by RibCys, a Thiazolidine Prodrug of L-cysteine. Med. Chem. Res., 1991, 1, 213-219.



18. Roberts, J.C.; Francetic, D.J. Time course for the elevation of glutathione in numerous organs of L1210-bearing CDF1 mice given the L-cysteine prodrug, RibCys. Toxicology Letters, 1991, 59, 245-251.


19. Roberts, J.C.; Francetic, D.J.; Zera, R.T. L-cysteine prodrug protects against cyclophosphamide urotoxicity without compromising therapeutic activity. Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology 1991, 28, 166-170.


20. Roberts, J.C.; Nagasawa, H.T.; Zera, R.T.; Fricke, R.F.; Goon, D.J. W. Prodrugs of L-cysteine as protective agents against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. 2-(polyhydroxyalky)-and 2-(Polyacetoxyalky)-Thiazolidine-4(R)-Carboxylic Acids. J. Med Chem. 1987, 30, 1891-1896.